An analysis of racially based pretextual traffic stops

What did you observe about the places with very low rates of racial disproportionality in traffic stops? Read the full article here.

Are traffic stops unconstitutional

I pulled you over because you were speeding by five miles an hour. We want to simply point out that if you're like Frank Baumgartner and you get stopped once every 30 years and it doesn't result in a search, that is that's probably fine—that calculation makes good sense. What about searches? Strangely—and this might initially appear surprising—populations who are more likely to be searched are also more likely to be let off with a warning or no action. And in low-crime neighborhoods, aka the white side of town or the middle-class neighborhoods, the police presence is much lighter, and also the police activity might be much less aggressive. The officers will only pull you over after they observe you clearly violating the traffic code in an important way. Cities are changing fast. But we found the odds were significantly higher for blacks, than for white and even Hispanic drivers, compared to their respective population shares. We looked systematically across all the municipalities of North Carolina and we found that the biggest predictor of low disparity is having black representation on the city council. We also looked at a city-by-city comparison of the proportion of whites, blacks, and Hispanics who live in that town to the proportion that they represent in the traffic stop data. It indicates that the agencies of government do respond to politics. The downside of all this is that they are consistently given the signal that they're a suspect. These are broad systematic, institutionalized, culturally normative practices and they're just part of almost every police department almost. It's a very inefficient use of police officers' time. White, middle-class drivers are more likely to get a ticket.

The expressed goal was to suss out disparities in policing. These are broad systematic, institutionalized, culturally normative practices and they're just part of almost every police department almost.

https www nationalgeographic com magazine 2018 04 the stop race police traffic

And white, middle-class drivers are more likely to get a ticket. And that's typically what happens to white drivers.

racial profiling traffic stops

What did you find about the rate at which contraband was detected at these stops? It would seem counterintuitive to most readers, but if you're objectively breaking the law—you're speeding or you run through a stop sign—you deserve to get a ticket. Our main focus in the book is who gets searched after a traffic stop because being searched is sign that the officer views you with suspicion.

Pretext stop texas

If [a traffic stop] is a pretext and it's the third time it has happened to you since you turned 16 years old and you got your driver's license, and you're only 17, you know that the officer is simply suspicious of you almost no matter what you're doing. What were the outcome of these types of searches? And white, middle-class drivers are more likely to get a ticket. So if you're a person like me, a white middle-class male, there's no reason the officer is going to develop a suspicion. And the Supreme Court has ruled consistently that that is OK, because it's just, after all, a momentary inconvenience. They write a lot of tickets, but they don't search very many cars—just 0. In their book, Baumgartner and his co-authors highlight the racial disparities evident in their analysis of traffic stop data from North Carolina. That is correlated with having a large black share in the population and having a large share of black voting in the most recent election.
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Are Traffic Stops a Pretext for Racial Profiling?